This week marks an important campaign for us at JHS Pacific: John Howard Society Week!

An annual initiative spearheaded by JHS Canada, JHS Week provides us with an opportunity to speak loudly about our innovative service delivery and celebrate our impact in the communities we serve.

Last year, we celebrated JHS Week by launching this blog, and since then we’ve seen over 1,000 people stop by to learn more about what we do, who we serve, and the issues we tackle.

This year, we are building on the momentum and furthering our commitment to sharing stories of resilience, determination, and community – that is, stories from our frontline staff, service users, programs and others in the JHS community.

To honour this commitment, we thought to ourselves, what better way to speak up about our programs, the incredible staff that drive them, and the equally incredible people they serve than to utilize the power of social media?

JHS staff and service user sit down at a coffee shop wearing masks, looking at the camera.

JHS PACIFIC IS NOW ON SOCIAL! FIND @JHSPACIFIC ON

We are excited to share stories, celebrate achievements across our sector, shine a light on issues faced by our communities, and provide resources to individuals in need of support through these channels, and hope you follow along for the journey!

To kick off social, we are excited to share the release of our first ever video production: our 2020 Impact Report

While 2020 presented many challenges, JHS Pacific’s commitment to serving vulnerable people with complex needs never wavered, and this short video highlights that. We are proud of the impacts that we have had in the lives of the people we served last year, and are pleased to share the lived experience and expertise of our staff and service users on the frontlines, who join us in this video to share how JHS Pacific made a difference in community throughout 2020.

“The impact of COVID gives us a reason to reconnect with our purpose, to celebrate what we have accomplished during this difficult period and to recommit to building back better once this pandemic has ebbed.”

– Catherine Latimer, JHS Pacific Canada

As an organization with its roots in social justice and the Canadian criminal justice system, we are proud of the ways in which we’ve served community throughout the multitude of crises before us: the housing crisis, overdose epidemic, and COVID-19 pandemic, to name the most prominent. Our impact report instills us with inspiration and hope to continue carrying out our work and to expand it however we can to serve more people in more ways.

We hope to see many of our blog readers join us on social media for ongoing opportunities to learn, engage, and get inspired by what we can achieve when we work together.

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